Pressy: So Awesome It Completes Kickstarter In A Day (Engadget.com)

So, I had my doubts. Would I really use a clicky in my 3.5mm port? Watch the video at the end. I bet you’ll pitch in $5 toward the Kickstarter, too!

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DNP Pressy the onebutton Android controller so cool it was Kickstarted in under a day

If Kickstarter had a 24-hour funders club, Pebble and the Bolex Camera would be welcoming Pressy today. In under a day, the multifunction Android controller has more than doubled its $40,000 goal (raising $108,435 from 4,889 backers as of this writing) and with 45 days left to go, the numbers keep climbing. Perhaps its simplicity is what’s making it such a hit. Pressy plugs into any Android device’s headphone port (Gingerbread and above), and clicking its unobtrusive 0.7mm-tall button controls and automates any manner of your gizmo’s functions. Through its app you can assign a given task to a sequence of clicks; it’s up to you if it takes two short clicks to speed-dial your mom or one long press to snap an unobtrusive picture, for example. You can still use it if you have a pair of headphones in too, with the cans’ play button subbing in for control. Clever.

Unlike other Kickstarters, this isn’t some far-off prospect: Developer Nimrod Back has promised Pressy will be available within four months. A basic Pressy will set you back $17, for a choice of colors with a keychain storage sheath you’ll have to pony up $25. Oh, and if you fancy yourself a programmer and want the device’s API, then drop $1,000 and make that tier’s one other pledge less lonely.

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PAX Prime 2013 Hosts $1+ Million eSports Prizes (GameSpot.com)

Though these prize amounts don’t begin to rival DOTA 2’s nearly $3 million in total cash awards, if Major League Gaming has it’s way, they soon will. Several games, including Guild Wars 2’s PVP tournament, will find either their national or international championship bouts fought at PAX Prime this year. At first glance, it seems PAX is ready to see over $1 million dished out to deserving teams.

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Halo 4, League of Legends Championships lead eSports at PAX

$300,000 on the line for Halo’s first-ever Global Championship, with $200,000 going to the winners.

The Halo 4 Global Championships, League of Legends Season 3 North American Playoffs, World of Tanks International World Finals, MLG Call of Duty Invitational, and Smite North American Invitational will all be held at PAX Prime this weekend.

Several former Major League Gaming Halo champions are competing, including Michael “StrongSide” Cavanaugh, Eric “Snip3down” Wrona, and Faisal “Goofy” Khan. A schedule and live stream information can be found on the official official 343 site. An interview with Frank O’Connor, Development Director for the Halo franchise at 343 Industries will be available this weekend.$300,000 is on the line for Halo’s first-ever Global Championship, with $200,000 going to the winners. The tournament will be held at Benaroya Hall in Seattle, the same location Valve used for the Dota 2 International Championships.

Last week at Gamescom, three European teams–Fnatic, Lemondogs, and Gambit Gaming–qualified for the League of Legends World Championships in October.

Now another $100,000 is on the line and four spots for the North American teams to the World Championships. With North America’s win over Europe at the All-Star game, the region gets an additional spot at the Finals.

Teams Cloud 9 and Vulcun wait in the wings, as fan-favorites Team SoloMid, Counter Logic Gaming, Curse, and Dignitas battle it out in the opening rounds. A schedule and live stream information can be found on the official Riot eSports site.

Major League Gaming and Turtle Beach are hosting an 8-team $10,000 Call of Duty Invitational featuring Anaheim Champions Complexity, EnvyUs, Impact, Unite, Kaliber, Soar, Faze, and Bad History.

Teams were invited based on their 2013 Call of Duty Championship and MLG Pro Circuit performances and the MLG Pro Points Rankings. The broadcast schedule can be found onMLG’s site, and the stream can be watched on MLG TV.

The world finals of the World of Tanks Open tournament will be on display, with $100,000 up for grabs for the best teams from North America, Russia, Europe, China, South East Asia, and South America. Twitch.tv will be broadcasting the tournament on Sunday, September 1 at Showbox SoDo in Seattle.

2013 International Serious Play Award Winners (Gamasutra.com)

Gamers may not actually know many of these titles, but these games are “serious games geared toward teaching, business, health awareness, or advocacy”. Best In Show? MIT Game Lab’s Phantomation.

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The annual Serious Play Conference DigiPen Institute of Technology has announced the winning entries for its International Serious Play Awards, honoring serious games geared toward teaching, business, health awareness or advocacy.

MIT Game Lab’s educational game Phantomation, designed to teach animation students fundamentals of both key framing and real-time animation, was named Best in Show. Other studios were awarded medals for their submissions, including the Canadian Space Agency and Schell Games.

Here’s the full list of winners, via the Serious Play Conference:

  • Gold Medal awards
    • Play Forward: Elm City Stories, Schell Games and Digital Mill (Healthcare/Medical)
    • Cornak, Succubus Interactive (Business)
    • DragonBox Algebra 12, WeWantToKnow AS (Education)
    • Game Over Gopher, New Mexico State University Learning Games Lab (Education)
    • Planting the Seed, Canadian Space Agency (Education)
    • Practice Operations, Muzzy Lane Operations (Education)
    • Ratio Rumble, New Mexico State University Learning Games Lab (Education)
  • Silver Medal awards
    • Quandry, FableVision Studios (Education)
    • Thump The Ultimate Math Practice, Mathtoons Media Inc. (Education)
    • Tilt World, Nicole Lazzaro (Games for Good)
    • Tunnel Tail, BEST Foundation (Games for Good)
    • Cyber Awareness Challenge, Carney Inc and SAIC (Government/Military)
    • At Risk in Primary Care, Kognito Interactive (Healthcare/Medical)
    • Re-Mission 2, HopeLab (Healthcare/medical)
  • Bronze Medal awards
    • Special Operation Halo Jump, Inhance Digital (Government/Military)
    • Project Moonwalk, Project Whitecard Studios (Education)
    • VRUM – Aprendendo sobre o transito, ThinkBox Games (Education)

Final Fantasy XIV: Leveling 1-30 Guide (TenTonHammer.com)

For players who are new to the FFXIV franchise, some of the game mechanics in FFXIV are definitely different than for other MMORPGs. Usually I’m a player who does *every* quest I see, but that’s a big no-no for FFXIV since that means leveling additional classes on your same character will be much harder as you left no quests for them to complete.

Here are a few other tips provided by TTH.

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Leveling in FFXIV: A Realm Reborn can be daunting at times, especially starting around level fifteen when the game starts letting go of the training wheels and begins opening up more options but starts providing less direction. The goal of this guide to help walk you through until level 30, at which point you should be able to finish the last twenty levels without much of a hitch.

Hunting Log

The Value of a Quest

One thing to make clear – quests are valuable for one specific reason – they are one time ordeals. If you do a quest that is a non-class specific quest then it is done for good. With this in mind, never ever clear the quests in the starting zone outside of your own until you start leveling up other classes. Don’t start leveling up another class in earnest either until you hit level 30.

There is some strong reasoning behind this. First, you get a bonus for leveling up other classes based on your highest level class. The higher your level, the more XP your battle classes will get as you level up. So you’re wasting XP if you do it any sooner than 30, outside of maybe getting a Conjurer to level 8 for Protect.

Next, quests are valuable because you can use them to advance really quickly and do not have limits like guildleves have. So if you do a quest that you’re 5 levels over right now, when you are on another class on the same character that is five levels below where you’re at, you won’t have that quest available to you which isn’t fun.

Leveling Tips

Food is a must while leveling. Consume it whenever the buff dissipates. It can be obtained cheaply off of the market and you should swim in different level appropriate foods as you quest through the game. The XP bonus is worth it.

Most of the leveling experience, especially in the first twenty levels, is a tutorial designed to teach the basics of the game. Many features will not unlock until you go through the various quests. Including the dye quest, which is around level 15 in Vepser Bay (I think) in Western Thanalan.

FATEs are repeatable and are as much XP as one quest. They are an efficient way to level no matter what. Go to where level appropriate FATEs are, complete them, and move to the next one. Do this over and over and you will level rather quickly.

Some classes are not as efficient as others. Conjurers will not level as fast as a Lancer. However, Conjurers will have a slightly easier time getting into the duty finder. It’s not that big of a deal, especially since you can change classes on the fly.

You get a 50% bonus XP if your class is below the level of your highest class for FATEs, Guildleves, and monster kills.

Hunting Log

Hunting Log

Your hunting log gives a considerable XP bonus for killing NPCs that you’ll kill anyway while questing. In the 10-20 area we’re talking 5k XP for killing a few enemies.

While leveling I totally neglected my hunting log which caused me to miss a ton of XP and backtrack a bunch. Don’t be like me in that regard, be sure to check it often.

Super crazy bonus – your hunting log can tell you locations to “hunt.” Look for enemies at or around your level, that is where the quests will be.

Starting Out (Levels 1 – 5)

The first five levels are mostly done within the city and surrounding areas of the city. The quests differ a little bit between the major city states and there isn’t really a lot to say other than your class quest and your story quest will give you most of your progression and you won’t even be able to leave the city until some of the quests are completed. The low level FATEs are mostly available right outside of the city gates and there are no other options for leveling at this point.

If you are leveling an additional class, then do your class quests and grind outside of the city on mobs at or a few levels above your level.

A Newbie No More (Levels 5 – 10)

The next five levels feature more of the same and will be in the same maps (Lower/Middle La Noscea, Central Thanalan, Central Shroud, etc.). You’re going to primarily want to follow your story quests (the one with the cool quest border) for these levels, as it’s going to take you pretty much to the best spots to level / quest at.

Here is where people make a strong argument to NOT side quest and just follow the story quests and do the FATEs. I find that the first 10 levels on another class are easy enough to not worry with it and make your life a bit easier.

Getting Ready for the Big Time (Levels 10 – 15)

At level 10 Guildhests open up which will give you a HUGE XP bonus on the first completion. Do those as soon as the quest becomes available. You’re still going to be stuck mostly in the same city-state and you can’t leave until you finish your story quest (which wraps up around level 15). So once more, follow your story quest, do the side quests, etc.

Guildleves open up, but you only get 3 allowances every 12 hours, so you’ll want to think really hard about consuming them now when leveling is rather easy or just saving them (you can have up to 99) for later levels or other classes. So far the theme is “save everything and just grind enemies FATEs” but realistically that’s all you can do up until this point.

FFXVI Lvl10

Exploring the World (Levels 15 – 20)

At this point you can finally leave your city-state and you’re going to want to once again follow your story quests because they open up three new dungeons for you to complete. I did a lot of side quests and didn’t unlock the airship until 17 and was woefully overleveled for a lot of the content, so you may or may not want to rush through your story quest as your level permits.

As a note, at this point you can farm dungeons over and over to level if you so desire.  You don’t get a huge chunk of XP, but it’s a noticeable amount.

The Grind Sets In (Levels 20 – 30)

At this point, around level 20, you’re going to get more dungeons, Guildhests, and your story is going to let you fight a boss who, after completing it, gives you a ton of XP and allows you to join a Free Company which decides your quest progression path from this point onward.

You have a few options for grinding; the best FATEs are in Eastern Thanalan (in my opinion), Upper La Noscea (the western side of the map), and East Shroud in the mid-twenties. Once you get your mount then grinding FATEs becomes trivial since you can easily move between them without worrying so much about them being completed by the time you arrive.

Your hunting log can be a really impressive source of XP at these levels too. You get 8k or so for killing enemies that you would kill normally, or 10% of a level at level 25. So it’s sort of kind of a big deal as far as XP goes.

Past Level 30

After level 30 you’re going to pretty much be set on the process of questing if you want to, doing dungeons and Guildhests when they become available, and grouping up to do FATEs. You can also just grind the levels away if you so choose, that’s a viable option as well.

Go forth and explore the world! Just remember to eat food, keep your buffs up, and have fun!

3D Hubs’ Crowdsource Project Backed By London VC Firm (VentureBeat.com)

In case 3D printing wasn’t heading to the mainstream soon enough, high-end estimates have the industry generating a half-trillion dollars in revenue in the next decade or so. In an effort to capitalize on the early entrance to the already booming market, Balderton Capitol has just backed 3D Hubs’ crowdsourcing effort to create a worldwide network of 3D printers. The project would allow folks to find and use a local printer, send their request to print, pay a small additional fee for the service, then pick up the items instead of waiting for shipping. (This would also keep the “little guys” viable as Staples and UPS Stores have also tossed their hats into the 3D printing ring.)

I think far more people would be interested in 3D printing if they had a local resource to answer questions directly and build a rapport with. Plus, that substantially lowers the cost of an initial investment into the marketplace. “Try before you buy.”

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Balderton Capital backs crowdsourced 3D printing network 3D Hubs

Balderton Capital backs crowdsourced 3D printing network 3D Hubs

London-headquartered VC firm Balderton Capital is betting on popular demand for 3D printing with a seed-stage investment in 3D printing network 3D Hubs.

The rate of growth for 3D printing is tremendous. About 23,000 printers were sold in 2011, according to a recent McKinsey report, which is up 300% in average annual growth since 2007. The industry as a whole could have an economic impact of $230-$550 billion per year by 2025.

3D Hubs, a six-person team based in Amsterdam, is building a global network that connects people who want to print with 3D printer owners. Here’s how it works: 3D printer owners sign up to be listed on their local “Hub”, which sets its own price per print plus material used. 3D Hubs performs a quality check for each uploaded digital model, delivers the order and processes the payment. It adds a 15% charge on top of the quoted price for each print.

The community aspect is a big part of 3D Hubs’ offer — unlike centralized services, customers know they’re supporting local makers and can pick up prints rather than wait for them to be shipped. Expansion follows supply and demand, with cities “unlocked” once a certain number of printers become available. The network currently spans over 500 printer locations in cities including London, Amsterdam, Berlin, Antwerp and Copenhagen.

Other options for those without a 3D printer to call their own include Shapeways, an online marketplace for making, buying and selling 3D printed products that ships anywhere in the world. Staples in the Netherlands and UPS in the US, also plan to offer on-demand 3D printing services.

Final Fantasy XIV: All Sales Stopped (Kotaku.com)

As one of the (un)fortunate players who was in during Beta Test 4 (a.k.a. “open beta”) and attempting to play during Early Access, I can attest to the overwhelming server and maintenance issues suffered by this game. However, I’ve never seen a game simply stop allowing sales before though. I hope this doesn’t come back to haunt them.

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Final Fantasy XIV Is So Popular, Square Enix is Halting Sales

Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn‘s launch is experiencing crowded servers. So what is Square Enix’s temporary workaround? Stop digital download sales.

In an official notice on Square Enix’s Facebook page, the company writes:P

Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to FINAL FANTASY XIV: A Realm Reborn, we are currently experiencing extremely long wait times for users to be able to log in and play. As a temporary measure, we will halt sales of FINAL FANTASY XIV: A REALM REBORN’s digital download products so we can accommodate all of those wishing to play. We are working to expand our server capacity in the coming days.

Launch headaches are fairly common for big MMOs. On Square Enix’s Facebook page, of course there are FFXIV players upset about the congestion, the inability to play, and Square Enix’s shortage of servers.

Some, however, are looking at this in a positive light: MMOs that start off like this must be good! Ha, that’s not always true and don’t take this heavy congestion as a Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. Just be prepared for a variety of issues as the game launches.

5 Takeaways From Gamescom 2013 (Gamasutra.com)

Indie games have long had cult followings so it’s no surprise that Gamasutra found an Indie-heavy presence at Gamescom. Read on to find out what the five biggest takeaways were for them at Gamescom.

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Five takeaways from GDC Europe 2013

The GDC Europe conference is over for another year (Gamasutra’s full coverage here), and as partner event Gamescom begins to wind down on the press front, I’ve been collating the various tidbits that I’ve taken away from this week.

There was already plenty to think about with regards to the various talks that were given over the last several days, but numerous conversations I had with developers, publishers et al also cemented a number of key points that appeared to brim to the surface on multiple occasions.

Here’s the five main talking points that I seemingly couldn’t escape from throughout the week.

1. Mobile is a massive market, but it’s not the be all and end all

There were, of course, hundreds of developers all eager to show off their mobile games during the show, and a good portion of the talks at GDC Europe centred around the mobile market.

But there was also notable unrest. Many developers I talked to, some who had dabbled in mobile and others who had not, were quite frankly feeling a little sick and tired of the sentiment that if you’re not making a game for mobile platforms, you face being irrelevant.

The team behind Nintendo 3DS game SteamWorld Dig, for example, had previously released a mobile game — and while it provided decent enough sales, the studio wasn’t really all that happy to eventually have its game lost to the destructive tide of mobile games that land on the iOS App Store every day.

The 3DS eShop has been a different story entirely for the Image and Form team. While there clearly aren’t as many potential consumers to hook, the fact that the team’s game was one of only a handful of titles that was made available during its launch week meant that visibility was high, and a feature on the front page of the eShop meant even more sales.

I heard a similar sentiment from plenty of other developers too, including Shadow of the Damneddirector Massimo Guarini. The industry veteran (who founded the studio Ovosonico) revealed his PS Vita game Murasaki Baby earlier this week, and he too doesn’t see the appeal of launching a game onto an online store where he’ll be battling against hundreds and thousands of other titles to rise to the top for a brief space of time.

Murasaki Baby.jpgMassimo Guarini’s Murasaki BabyThis isn’t anything new, of course — just last month Thomas Was Alone creator Mike Bithell noted that “the middle ground devs all ran off to mobile, and left the door unlocked for us.” He too announced a Sony partnership this week, as his upcoming game Volume will debut on PS4 and PS Vita.

But whereas these sorts of musings have been going on for a while, I really got the impression this week that, for many more developers, there’s acknowledgement that mobile isn’t the answer to everything.

2. The confusing indie console message

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll know that console manufacturers absolutely adore indie devs all of a sudden.

Jump back just a year ago, and The Big Three were touting their massive AAA releases on a regular basis. Throughout this week, there’s a notable indie movement, as there has been throughout 2013: Sony’s conference was packed full of indie games, Microsoft revealed its ID@Xbox self-publishing program, and Nintendo was bigging up a number of its indie games on Nintendo 3DS, including the aforementioned SteamWorld Dig.

But while it all sounds fantastic on the surface, I came away from this week rather confused about whether it’s all for show, or whether these console giants are truly positioning indie games as a main selling point.

Take the contrast between Sony’s conference and its Gamescom show floor display, for example. I’d set out to play as many of the indie games coming to Sony consoles as possible, but when I arrived at the massive Sony booth, it was rather difficult to actually find the indie games.

That’s because while the triple-A releases had each been granted massive space with a handful of monitors each, the indie games had been relegated to the edges and corners of the booth, with barely any signposting at all.

Now, I’m not suggesting that Sony should have thrown OlliOlliSpelunky or Metrico stands up right next to the potentially millions-selling triple-A PS3 and PS4 games that Sony has on the cards — I’d personally love if they’d have done so, but I’m not naive enough to expect that would have been the case.

But when I say that the indie games appeared to be a complete afterthought of the booth, I’m not exaggerating. You had to essentially skim around the outskirts of the Sony booth, away from all the main games, and then peer down at the scattered Vitas to actually find the games you wanted to play.

Multiple times I had to choose a landmark somewhere else in the room — “Let’s meet just next to the massive The Last of Us booth, then we can walk to my game from there” — because it was so difficult to find any individual indie games. Numerous of the devs that I talked to weren’t very happy about it either.

To be fair, at least I could find some indie games at the Sony booth. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong place, but I didn’t see a single indie game at either the massive Nintendo or Microsoft areas. Again, I stress that I wasn’t hugely surprised by this at all, but it does seem to clash somewhat with the indie pushes that appear to be happening online and during conferences.

From my perspective, it’s clear that these companies are well aware that indie games aren’t going to sell consoles to a certain segment of players, hence why the triple-A showing is still very much front and center. Still, it’s discouraging to see one message being pushing in one area, and then seeing an entirely different message in another.

3. Exciting and quirky new hardware still brings in the masses

People are always happy to queue up or stand around to see something a bit different, and this year was no different.

The lines to experience the Oculus Rift VR headset were lengthy, and I had plenty of conversations about how the new HD visuals looked and felt, and what could potentially be done with the technology.

I hadn’t tried the standard version of the Oculus Rift, but pretty much everyone I talked to who had sampled both the standard and HD versions said that there wasn’t a great deal of difference between the two. Still, it’s early days for the hardware, and no doubt numerous months before it will be made available to the public.

But it wasn’t just the Rift that was pulling in the crowds. Mikolaj Kaminski’s Achtung Arcade, an arcade machine packed full of smaller games from the dev, sat quietly in a corner until someone decided to pick up a controller — at which point a crowd would gather to see what all the fuss was about.

And the Luggatron was particularly exciting. Joon Van Hove from Glitchnap, who has previously created arcade-style machines in the most wackiest of places (for example, integrated into a baby carriage) wanted to bring another of his crazy machines to GDC Europe, but could only check one bag in.

This gave him the idea to build the Luggatron — an arcade machine built into a suitcase, with the monitor on the outside. It’s more than an impressive feat, and as you’d expect, plenty of people wanted to give it a try.

It’s remarkable to see this sort of innovation with your own eyes, and it’s no wonder that so many of these smaller indie shows like Wild Rumpus and Bit of Alright are growing so rapidly in popularity, when they have great ideas like these to enjoy.

4. Being an indie console launch title is not the same as being a AAA launch title

Whenever a new Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo console launch rolls around, we regularly hear the same studio names — Ubisoft, for example, are massive fans of early console adoptions, and always make sure to have at least a handful of titles ready for launch.

It’s obvious why, of course: Gamers want to pick up a small number of games with their new consoles, sometimes regardless of quality, and so having a wide spread of titles at launch that perhaps don’t incur as large production costs as normal can be very beneficial. Of course, your relationship with the manufacturer won’t exactly be harmed either.

And there’s the added bonus that the press wants to talk about each and every console launch game. If you’re launching alongside a games console, you are going to get articles all over the shop.

As it turns out, however, it may be the case that smaller indie games delivered at launch don’t see such benefits. As part of a talk earlier this year, Felix Bohatsch from Broken Rules revealed that his game Chasing Aurora had not received any sort of sales spike at the Wii U launch whatsoever.

I’m not going to pretend that Chasing Aurora was fantastic and essential — even Bohatsch himself admitted that the game needed more time, and it was rushed for release at launch — but the fact that the studio saw zero sales spike at launch, while triple-A companies churn out some awful stuff for console launches and still see enough of a spike to make it worthwhile, should really tell us something.

Bohatsch’s reasoning was that it was a combination of players picking up a handful of triple-A games and being satisfied enough with that, and a slightly high price point for the amount of content Broken Rules was offering. From my point of view, it does seem to make sense that more traditional players are going to be focusing on the likes of New Super Mario Bros. U and Nintendo Land instead of heading to the new eShop and plucking out games at random.

In fact, Bohatsch suggested that if he could go back and do it again, he’d instead launch a few months after the Wii U came out, in a bid to catch those people who had finished off all the triple-A titles, and were now hungry for me. It’s an angle well worth considering for any developers who are currently crunching hard to be ready for the upcoming Xbox One and PlayStation 4 launches.

5. The emotional game uprising

Although I don’t like to admit it, I regularly shed a tear or five when watching tear-jerker movies and TV shows. In contrast, I cried for the first time ever at a video game last year — the glorious The Walking Dead.

Stirring up emotion in players has never really been at the forefront of game design — well, unless you’re David Cage, of course — but the last year has definitely seen a surge of developers talking about injecting emotion and personality into their characters.

Take the recent Brothers, for example, which managed to stir up emotion in players simply through gameplay, rather than any real storyline. Telltale and Starbreeze aren’t the only studios exploring emotion either, as plenty of conversations I had this week involved making the player feel something for the characters and their tales.

Quantic Dream’s Cage was once again doling out the prize sentences as per usual, explaining in his GDC Europe talk that “we should learn from films” when it comes to injecting emotion into games.

But there were plenty of developers talking about emotional responses to non-film-like games too. Gone Home was mentioned numerous titles, for example, while the aforementioned Massimo Guarini is currently building an entire game around emotion, as players take his Murasaki Baby by the hand and guide her through fear and elation.

There’s still a long way to go, no doubt, until we can truly claim that video games stir up the range of emotions that other mediums have been mustering up for years. But the overall impression I got this week is that plenty of steps are being taken in the right direction.

The Secret World: Get Your Art Designs Into the Game!

Not be outdone by recent EverQuest Landmark announcements, Funcom is now going to allow players with mad outfit art skills to get their designs into the game. This contest runs until September 15th, so get your works in now!

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Funcom“Get your art in the game!” Contest Entry Details

As announced in this article on The Secret World website, we are holding a contest where you can send in a design for an outfit (male and/or female) you created yourself.

The contest runs from August 16th until September 15th, 2013. During that time, you can enter your design suggestion (as a drawing, sketch, painting …). You can also send in more than one design. A jury consisting of a team of our developers will then rate all entries and will pick the five best designs for each male and female outfits – so a total of 10 designs. Those 10 designs will then be put up on the forums where everyone will have the chance to vote on his/her preferred design. So you – the players – will pick the final winner of the contest.

The winning outfit design will afterwards be created by our dev team and will be made available in-game in the The Secret World item store. The winner will of course receive this outfit for all of his/her characters for free!

Here are the rules about how to send in your entry for the contest:

  • Every art contribution sent must be of your own creation or be sent with the consent of its creators!
  • For unisex outfits, please provide a male and female drawing, as part of the same submission, so we can see how it fits each gender.
  • Post your design (graphic should be a high resolution .JPEG or .PNG file with a neutral background (preferably white or grey)) in this thread on the The Secret World forums. That thread also provides additional guidelines for potential entries so please make sure you read it before submitting an entry.
  • Alternatively you can also upload your art file (graphic should be a high resolution .JPEG or .PNG file with a neutral background (preferably white or grey)) to a file sharing service of your choice. For example the free service WeTransfer (https://www.wetransfer.com/).
  • If you post your entry on the forums, you don’t have to do anything in addition.
  • If you chose to upload your file to a file sharing service, you have to send us the link to your file by email to contest@thesecretworld.com .
    Please include the following information with your email:
    Subject: “Get your art in the game”
    Text:

    • Your full name
    • Your address (street, city, country)
    • The donwload link to your art file

TERA: Cosplay Contest – Get Dressed!

Have they done this before and I just didn’t see it? TERA is a perfect MMORPG to cosplay. (Unfortunately, IRL, I’m the lovechild of a Baraka and a Popori.)

Be sure to create your best TERA-related cosplay outfit and snap a few pics (as well as following all of the rules below) to send to the devs. The top three submissions will win the Elin statue and an eight-piece Halloween themed accessory bundle. Best of luck!

(By the way, is anyone as excited as me to see someone cosplay a BAM? That’d be awesome!)

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TERA Cosplay Contest

TERA Cosplay Contest

Do you have an amazing castanic outfit that you showed off at San Diego Comic-Con? Maybe you’ve been working for months on your kumas outfit so you could debut it at PAX Prime!

Well then, this is the contest for you! Create or re-use your TERA cosplay, and send us a picture for your chance to win an Arcadia elin figurine! Make sure to submit your pictures by 11:59 p.m. PDT on October 27, 2013 for your chance to win!

Figurine Full

Prizes:

The top three submissions will receive one elin figurine (pictured above) and one Halloween accessory bundle. The Halloween accessory bundle contains one of each of the following:

  • Sunbright Mask
  • Nightsky Mask
  • Sunbright Domino Mask
  • Nightsky Domino Mask
  • Frankenhat
  • Ailuri Giantkiller Mask
  • Red Bat Hairband
  • Black Bat Hairband

Instructions:

  1.   Create or re-use a previously created TERA cosplay.
  2.   Take a minimum of two (2) pictures.
    • a.    At least one picture should be of you holding a sign or piece of paper that says “TERA Rocks 2013” on it. This picture will not be posted to our website, even if you win. You do not have to be wearing your outfit in this picture—but the photo needs to provide reasonable verification (as determined by our judges) that you are responsible for the cosplay in the other photo(s).
    • b.    At least one picture should be of you in your cosplay outfit. More pictures are always good as it allows us to see the detail! These pictures can be from a previous event or taken at different times.
  3.   Do not modify your pictures with any image-enhancing programs (such as Adobe Photoshop) except to resize.
  4.   Submit a .JPG version of the photos to community@enmasse.com by 11:59 p.m. PDT on Sunday, October 27, 2013.
    • a.    In your email, please include your main character and server name.
    • b.    Each photo should be no larger than 2MB in size.
    • c.    Limit of one entry per person.
  5.   This contest is for participants in North America only.
  6.   All standard En Masse Entertainment contest rules apply.
  7.   The winners will be announced on October 31, 2013.

En Masse staff will judge each submission on the creativity, technique, and overall look of your outfit. Extra points will be awarded to anyone who cosplays a BAM!

Happy crafting!

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