Joseph Staten Leaves Bungie

Joseph Staten, one of Bungie’s greats, has now left the company. This man was brought on as a product manager/ localization expert during Myth II: Soulbringer in 1998. He went on to be part of the script writing team team for Oni and helped influence much of the Halo universe that many of us grew to love. I’m a long time Bungie fan and he will be missed.

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At Bungie, we consider ourselves lucky. Every day, we get to do what we love in an amazing place, alongside people we respect and admire. No one embodies that more than Joseph Staten. Few have contributed as much to our success. To that end, it is with no small degree of sadness that we say “Godspeed” to more than just a Grizzled Ancient, but an old, dear friend. And it is with no small degree of delight and intrigue that we imagine what worlds he might take us to next.

Here are a few words from the man himself.

Dear community friends,

After fifteen great years at Bungie, from the battlefields of Myth to the mysteries of Halo and beyond, I’m leaving to tackle new creative challenges. While this may come as a surprise, fear not. It’s been my pleasure building Destiny these past four years, and after the big reveal this Summer, our hugely talented team is on track for greatness. I’ll be cheering all of them, with all of you, when the game launches next year. Thank you for your support of me, and your continued support of Bungie. We couldn’t have done it without you.

Per Audacia Ad Astra!
Joseph Staten

It’s been an honor serving with you, Joseph. Thank you for everything.

YouGov: UK Majority Believes Video Games Cause Violence (Gamasutra.com)

Honestly, I feel like they’re asking all the wrong questions. Maybe the CDC’s investigation will return different results?

I do not believe normal, average people are going to be negatively impacted by violence in video games or TV or movies or paintball courses. I play violent video games, I still give to charity, and I’m still generous and loving with family and friends. It’s also extremely apparent that age is the biggest difference as to whether or not people believe if video games are a negative influence or not, which means public opinion should shift substantially over the next two decades.

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The debate surrounding whether video games cause real-world violence and aggression continues to rage on as it always has — especially with the launch of Grand Theft Auto V last week.

A new study from UK-based market research firm YouGov this week suggests that the more familiar a person is with video games in general, the less they believe that there is a connection between in-game violence and real-life violence.

Dr. Andrew Przybylski, a research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, surveyed nearly 2,000 adults in the UK, with a wide ranging mix of ages, beliefs and experience with video games. Of those surveyed, around 53 percent said they play games, with 19 percent saying they play games “most days.”

The survey found that 61 percent of UK residents believe that playing video games can be a cause of real-world violence and aggression.

Breaking down the data reveals far more interesting statistics, however. Take the age break-down, for example — most of the people surveyed between the ages of 18 and 39 disagreed that video games caused real-life aggression, while an overwhelming number of 60+ year olds said there was a link (79 percent, in fact).

Generation Gap 3.pngIn other words, the older the person surveyed, the more likely they were to believe that there’s a connection between video game violence and real-life violence. The older people surveyed also were more likely to disagree that video games can be utilized as an outlet for frustrations and aggression.

The experience and gender gaps

There were other notable gaps beside the age correlation — both gender and video game experience were picked out as part of the report.

71 percent of the women surveyed said that they believe violent video games can cause real-world aggression. This compared to 48 percent of men who agreed there was a connection.

And when looking at those people who have played games versus those who have no experience with games, the results are as you’d expect: 74 percent of those surveyed who don’t play games said games can cause aggression and violence, while 47 percent of those who play games agreed there was a connection.

Players who had experience with violent games, however, disagreed far more that there is a connection. 35 percent of people who play violent video games said violent games can lead to real-world violence.

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