Reddit’s Top 25 Android Games (Official List)

The Top 25 Android Games official list has been posted over on Reddit by pixel-freak. For those of you who love mobile gaming, and aren’t an iPhone junkie, read on!


Reddit’s Top 25 Android Games

Below is the full top 25 list we have voted for. It’s a pretty good list that I believe adequately represents the sentiment on both /r/androidgaming and /r/android. I’ve also created a full video presenting this list with some descriptions and praises, as well as some Redditor quotes, for each of these games which I’ve linked below.

A number of devs/PR reps/community managers etc are going to be popping in over time to give a wave here in this post. Let me start by giving a big thanks to all those that helped nominate and vote these games up, and to all the devs that made such excellent games. I learned a few lessons in gathering all this data and hope to do it again in the future over subcategories etc with a few tweaks based on those lessons. Without further adieu…..

25 – Rayman Jungle Run [Paid – $2.99]
24 – Asphalt 8 [Paid – $.99]
23 – Battleheart [Paid – $2.99]
22 – Triple Town [Free]
21 – Ingress [Free]
20 – Angry Birds [Free – ads]
19 – Kingdom Rush [Paid – $.99]
18 – Dots [Free]
17 – Bloons TD 5 Humble Bundle Sale [Paid – $2.99]
16 – Quadropus Rampage [Free]
15 – Jetpack Joyride [Free]
14 – The Bard’s Tale [Paid – $2.99] ON SALE
13 – The Room [Paid – $.99] ON SALE
12 – Superbrothers: Sword & Sorcery [Paid – $4.99]
11 – GTA: Vice City [Paid – $4.99]
10 – Plague Inc. [Free]
09 – Terraria [Free demo, Paid Unlock $4.99]
08 – Knights of Pen & Paper [Paid – $2.99]
07 – Osmos [Paid – $.99] ON SALE
06 – Super Hexagon [Paid – $2.99]
05 – Plants Vs. Zombies [Paid – $.99]
04 – Emulators
03 – Pixel Dungeon [Free]
02 – Game Dev Story [Paid – $2.50] ON SALE
01 – World of Goo [Paid – $2.99] [Demo – Free]

I’m on my way out of town in a couple days, but I promise I’ll release the full data set for those interested (we even have country data for part of it) and for transparency. In the future, any list I aggregate with have the transparency released the same day.

(*Edit: Fixed numbering. Reddit was auto-correcting my numbering backwards)

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Pressy: So Awesome It Completes Kickstarter In A Day (Engadget.com)

So, I had my doubts. Would I really use a clicky in my 3.5mm port? Watch the video at the end. I bet you’ll pitch in $5 toward the Kickstarter, too!

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DNP Pressy the onebutton Android controller so cool it was Kickstarted in under a day

If Kickstarter had a 24-hour funders club, Pebble and the Bolex Camera would be welcoming Pressy today. In under a day, the multifunction Android controller has more than doubled its $40,000 goal (raising $108,435 from 4,889 backers as of this writing) and with 45 days left to go, the numbers keep climbing. Perhaps its simplicity is what’s making it such a hit. Pressy plugs into any Android device’s headphone port (Gingerbread and above), and clicking its unobtrusive 0.7mm-tall button controls and automates any manner of your gizmo’s functions. Through its app you can assign a given task to a sequence of clicks; it’s up to you if it takes two short clicks to speed-dial your mom or one long press to snap an unobtrusive picture, for example. You can still use it if you have a pair of headphones in too, with the cans’ play button subbing in for control. Clever.

Unlike other Kickstarters, this isn’t some far-off prospect: Developer Nimrod Back has promised Pressy will be available within four months. A basic Pressy will set you back $17, for a choice of colors with a keychain storage sheath you’ll have to pony up $25. Oh, and if you fancy yourself a programmer and want the device’s API, then drop $1,000 and make that tier’s one other pledge less lonely.

Free Android Guide: Take Better Photos with Your Android Device

For a limited time, Google Play is offering for free a beginner’s guide to taking photos with an Android device.

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https://encrypted.google.com/books/images/frontcover/754ntJ-U7PYC?fife=w222

Peachpit Press is pleased to offer this book to Google Play customers for FREE for a limited time. Even though the price is $0.00, you will be prompted to complete the transaction with Google Wallet. This is necessary in order for the book to be delivered to your account. If you don’t have a credit card associated to your Google Wallet account, or if you don’t have a Google Wallet account at all, you’ll be prompted to add a new payment method upon first adding music or books from Google Play.

This invaluable guide on how to better use the camera on your Android phone will make all the difference in the world as you capture and share the world around you with others.

With Android Photography: Take Better Pictures with Your Android Phone by photographer Colby Brown, you’ll learn:

  • How to take a photo, including different grips for holding your phone
  • How to use all the controls and modes of the Android camera
  • Which third-party apps to use
  • Different photography styles and techniques for shooting portraits, travel, low-light, and wildlife
  • How to edit your photos with the stock Android app and third-party apps, including Snapseed
  • How to share your images
  • Some of the fun accessories available

Grab your Android phone, and start documenting your life today!

Google Play Offering

Nvidia’s “Shield” Price-Dropped $50 (CNET.com)

I have to say, I expected this. With an entire PS4 only costing $50 more than the original Nvidia Shield price, they really had to do something to make their handheld gaming device worth such a big price tag. After all, this is an Android powered device  (similar to the OUYA, though hand-held and portable). Hopefully this sets Nvidia up with a more sizeable share of the marketplace as a result.

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With a release date set for June 27, the portable gaming console will now cost $50 less than its original $349 price tag.

Nvidia's Shield will now sell for just $299.

Gamers eyeing Nvidia’s Shield will be able to buy the device on June 27 to the tune of only $299.

Officially unveiling the date and the price drop via a blog on Thursday, Nvidia explained why it cut the cost from $349.

We’ve heard from thousands of gamers that if the price was $299, we’d have a home run.

So we’re changing the price of Shield to $299.

If you’ve already pre-ordered Shield , you’ll be charged the new, lower price. You will only be charged $299 when the product ships.

Demoed at CES 2013 in January, the Nvidia Shield is an Android-based portable gaming system that unites the controller and a 5-inch 1,280×720-pixel touch screen into one single package. The Shield can handle all Google Play apps and stream PC games from Nvidia-based computers through a Wi-Fi connection.

Original CNET Article

OUYA? The Little Console That Could – Maybe

If you’re like me, you’d never heard of OUYA until last week when the cops were called to the convention to settle a dispute over the legality of OUYA showing up outside of the convention hall and offering their own booths. The publicity did nothing but excite folks about OUYA and give it a ton more press than it would have otherwise received. Go competition!

So, what is OUYA and why all the fuss?

Hands-on with the Ouya destined for store shelves

Eurogamer.net offers an extensive review of the OUYA. Below are a few excerpts of their review.

Kickstarted to the tune of $8.5 million, the Ouya console is one of crowdfunding’s high-profile success stories. Depending on who you listen to, it’s also the system to pull the rug from beneath Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo and forever shake up the video game industry as we know it. It liberates players, empowers developers and creates a brave new world for interactive entertainment – or so we’re told, at least. The hyperbole that has been written about Ouya would make the most seasoned spin doctor blush, but before you allow yourself to become too swept up in the hype, it’s worth remembering that when all is said and done, Ouya is just Android in a set-top box – and we’ve already spoken about how potentially disappointing that particular reality could be.

In purely physical terms, Ouya is small. The first thing likely to strike you when you open the packaging and remove the touching “Thank You” note inserted by the team behind the console is just how diminutive the system is. Compared to traditional gaming hardware, it’s absolutely tiny, although at 300 grams it has a heft which makes it feel solid and expensive. Béhar’s design is destined to divide opinion: the minimalist appearance ensures it doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb when placed next to your Blu-ray player and surround system, but a little more pizazz wouldn’t have gone amiss. Still, there’s a subtle, almost understated beauty to the machine, thanks to its glossy black top and sand-blasted aluminium casing. Around the back, you’ll find an array of ports and outputs. HDMI, USB, Micro USB, Ethernet and power cables all dock here.

Essentially an Android device without a screen, Ouya is based around Nvidia’s ageing Tegra 3 chipset, featuring a 1.7GHz quad-core CPU and GeForce graphics processor, encased in a small, fan-cooled cube-like package. Retailing for just £99/$99, it’s cheaper than your average entry-level Android handset, but lacks the same app and game support offered by other Android devices.

The controller is powered by two AA batteries, fitted behind metal panels which clip onto the main body of the pad via a set of magnets. The interface arrangement mimics that of the Xbox 360 controller, with the left-hand analogue stick raised slightly higher than the right-hand one in order to accommodate an eight-way digital pad. The face buttons adopt the now-standard diamond layout, and across the top there are four shoulder buttons – none of which offer analogue control, which could limit the machine’s suitability for hardcore racing simulators and FPS titles. The middle of the controller has a small capacitive touchpad which acts as a mouse pointer and can be used to negotiate certain menus, but it’s awkward to use and rarely provides the degree of accuracy you desire. Finally, there’s the Ouya button, which can be held down to jump back to the main menu from any point. It’s worth noting that by default, the Ouya is designed to run one application at a time – exiting back to the main menu will terminate the current game, so saving your progress is vital.

The Ouya pad’s design certainly isn’t unappealing, and it’s comfortable to use. There are some minor niggles to contend with, however. The “O” button sticks slightly when pressed down hard, and while the analogue stick dead zone issues are mostly resolved, the sticks themselves are still rather heavy to use, making precise aiming rather a chore.

Because it’s an Android device, adding peripherals to Ouya is blissfully easy. Bluetooth keyboards and mice can be paired with little fuss, making it much easier to input text and navigate menus. Additional Bluetooth gamepads can also be linked to the system, such as the official OnLive pad. OnLive is partnering with Ouya for the official launch, and while the unit we reviewed didn’t have the app pre-installed (it’s also absent from the Ouya store), we were able to sideload it onto the system and jump into a game of Batman: Arkham Asylum with the minimum of effort. By adding a USB hub, keyboard and mouse functionality is easily added and it’s here that Ouya surprises as a pretty neat little browsing device – a world away from the world of hardship, endurance and woe encountered when using the Raspberry Pi.

The console’s online store offers a selection of games, all of which are free to download and play, thanks to the manufacturer’s stipulation that all Ouya content offers gratis demos or free-to-play elements. For example, endless-runner Canabalt HD has a credit system which is renewed each day, with additional credits awarded for reaching 5000 metres in-game. Paying cash for the full version removes this limitation, as well as offering other bonuses, such as a different soundtrack and “classic” 2D visuals. It’s a mechanic which means you can jump straight into the action and decide for yourself if a game is worthy of your cash, but there are issues here, too. There’s no indication on the store listing page of how much each game costs – you only become notified at the point of purchase within the game itself. This is partly down to the fact that many of the games don’t expect you to shell out for the full version once you’ve sampled the demo, because you’re already playing the full version, and are expected to throw money at in-app purchases which grant more credit, items or time.

So, generally good stuff. Unfortunately, while the OUYA offers an extremely accessible entry fee of $99 and has solid Kidstarter funding and some positive press, I believe there are two major issues ahead for the OUYA.

First, it’s already got less than half the processing power of smartphones launched earlier this year. Phones such as the Samsung Galaxy S4 or the HTC One have a ton more processing power than the OUYA. A 1GHz processor is so…2011. A console has to launch with enough power to play the latest games and give developers reason to continue launching games on your platform. I think the OUYA is already struggling in this regard.

Second, consoles need incredible games to convince players they “need it”. While OUYA boasts support for 150 games (it dinged up from 149 earlier today), are any of those games individually reason enough to buy an OUYA? Here’s the official list of games supported by OUYA. However, given it’s an Android OS, that does mean OUYA can run regular smartphone apps, streaming, etc.

All that 1080p goodness isn’t just for gaming. OUYA brings all your favorite apps to the big screen, streaming shows, movies, and music directly into the living room. We’ve already partnered with Twitch.tv, Crunchyroll, iheartradio, TuneIn, XBMC, Plex and Flixster and are adding more to our list daily.

Unfortunately, without a HALO or Mario or The Last Of Us or real support from the major gaming studios, I don’t have a ton of confidence in the OUYA’s success. According to OUYAGamingSource.com, the best games at launch will be The Ball, Saturday Morning RPG, and Polarity, none of which really excite me. Just one of the blockbuster titles or franchises could mean a world of difference for OUYA.

That said, it’s not really all doom and gloom. Engadget’s hands-on last week left them with this:

Our latest experience with the Android-based gaming device has us feeling optimistic. While there’s certainly work left to be done, not the least of which is convincing consumers this is the console they need, it’s obvious that the company is taking customer feedback seriously. And that’s not something most companies can brag about.

What do you think? Are you looking to drop $99 just to investigate the hype? Is the low cost of entry something that makes OUYA more appealing? I’ve always been a fan of competition and usually root for the underdog. I think the concept is great, but to get me to drop off my PC gaming, I need more incentive. I’m definitely interested in how OUYA’s launch goes on June 25th. You can pre-order yours here.

911 App Uses Smartphones to Virtually Place Dispatchers at Scene of Emergencies (MDDIonline.com)

Being employed in the telecom industry since 2000, it’s great to see practical, helpful, possibly life-saving applications available for use on smartphones. As NextGen E911 is being deployed nationally, albeit slowly in many cases, expect to see texting, picture messaging, and more diagnostic uses for smartphones in emergencies.

Would you feel calm and collected enough during an emergency to start up an app and try to use it to save someone’s life?

MDDI Online Article Here

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911 App Uses Smartphones to Virtually Place Dispatchers at the Scene of Emergencies

The Android app enables 911 dispatchers to gather data such as blood pressure, heart rate, and breathing rate via a caller’s smartphone.

A team of researchers has developed a mobile medical application that harnesses smartphones to virtually place 911 dispatchers at the scene of emergency situations.

The app, developed by a team led by University of North Texas engineering professor Ram Dantu with support from the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, enables 911 dispatchers to remotely control the smartphone of a 911 caller at the scene, enabling the dispatcher to see video of the scene and collect vital information about the victim.

During emergency calls, 911 dispatchers ask callers basic questions to help them assess the situation, but callers don’t always know the answers.

“When a 911 operator asks the question, ‘Is the patient breathing?’ callers often have no idea,” Dantu said during a virtual press conference today.

A smartphone placed on a victim’s torso allows the emergency operator to view the victim’s breaths per minute. This allows the operator to gauge whether the caller should start CPR. Photo credit: Logan Widick, University of North Texas

The app his team created is intended to solve that problem. Using the software, a caller at the scene can place a smartphone on the victim’s chest to monitor their breathing rate and place the victim’s finger on the smartphone’s camera to check their heart rate. The app can also cufflessly monitor the victim’s blood pressure. All information captured is transmitted wirelessly to 911 dispatchers.

At the press conference, the research team also demonstrated the app’s CPR assistance feature. A 911 caller at the scene can strap a smartphone to their hands using a piece of clothing or a plastic bag, for example, to get instruction on how to perform CPR. The app can also provide real-time feedback—urging the caller to increase the speed or depth of compressions, for example.

The app also features text-to-speech technology, which can help in situations where a 911 caller doesn’t speak English or is hearing or speech impaired.

Henning Schultzrinne, of the Federal Communication Commission, said the app is one example of technology that can interface with the new Next Generation 911 systems being rolled out across the country. These IP-based systems replace the voice-only 911 systems used in the past and can incorporate new sources of information, such as text messages, images, video, and data.

The app has been tested by 40–50 individuals in a lab setting, and the researchers hope to launch a pilot in a hospital or nursing home environment soon, Dantu said. He said the app will require FDA approval, and the team’s next steps include talking with vendors of emergency dispatch protocols to learn how to integrate the app with their systems. It was initially developed for the Android platform, but the researchers also plan to launch a version that can run on Apple’s iOS. They hope to have a version of the app available for download in 2–3 months.

Attach Your iPhone to Anything, Anywhere With Clipless (Gizmag.com)

Clipless is about 72% of the way toward its $25,000 Kickstarter goal. This is an innovative, interesting “iPhone” device (can be used with any phone, any tablet, and I’m sure plenty of other gadgets). You attach a sticky-backed clip to the back of your device and it’s held in place via magnets on to walls, through clothes, etc. Genius!

Their Kickstarter run expires in less than a month. Head to their Kickstarter page to help support this project and preorder your Clipless for a starting donation of just $1.

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A company known as They Innovate has designed Clipless, a mounting device that fastens a smartphone to almost any place imaginable. A wall, clothes, car dashboards, and essentially anything with a moderately flat surface will work, according to the creators.

The purpose of Clipless is to do away with leather pouches. This product allows users to wear their phones as they would a pouch, but it uses a discreet disc and clip that attaches a phone to the wearer’s clothes.

Clipless consists of three pieces. The first is a connector stuck with semi-permanent adhesive to the back of your phone. This attaches to the second piece, the actual Clipless which attaches to the outside of your clothes by slotting into a disc, the third component, worn inside the fabric.

The adhesive is only good for one use, so to use a different phone, extra connectors would be necessary. Clipless can also be attached to other flat surfaces through a separate mount. The goal is for users to be able to use Clipless whether carrying their phones or mounting them to static locations.

The creators are adding NFC capability to the device. This opens up all kinds of options, such as launching a specific app when mounting at a certain location (e.g. a recipe app when mounting on the kitchen refrigerator).

They Innovate is seeking funding for its Clipless device on Kickstarter. At the time of writing, there are plenty of early bird backer offers left. These provide one Clipless, one connector, one clothing disc, and one NFC mount for US$17. Once those run out, the company is offering Clipless for $35.

The Kickstarter pitch below provides more information about Clipless.

Original Gizmag Article
Clipless On Kickstarter
Official Clipless Website

Check Out “Cerberus Anti Theft”

Cerberus anti theft

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lsdroid.cerberus

The day is half over but if you create an account today (June 6, 2013) you will revive a life time licence for Cerberus thanks to AppGratis.com!

Mobile Game…Like a Japanese Gamer! (Google Play)

Apparently Google believes it can entice me to download and play more mobile games by taunting me with what’s currently popular in Japan. How dare they use my love of anime against me. (Damnable data mining!)

Are you curious about what’s super hot in Japan right now? Then follow the link below.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/collection/promotion_30001c9_big_in_japan?utm_source=googleplay&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Big_in_Japan_A&pcampaignid=20130529_EM_US_Big_in_Japan_A_HeroCTA

If you’re curious – but not THAT curious – here are five games on that list.

Puzzle & DragonsCHAOS RINGS IISpace Invaders Infinity GeneDINO DOMINIONBattle Cats

1. Puzzle & Dragons

2. Chaos Rings II

3. Space Invaders Infinity Gene

4. Dino Dominion

5. Battle Cats

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